Tag Archives: OpenXML

The Model of a very modern PowerPivot – without the add-in

My last post demonstrated a method by which explicit PowerPivot DAX measures could be created in any version of Excel 2013 without  the PowerPivot add-in. Here’s another method, this time using Excel 2010’s PowerPivot add-in (available for all versions of 2010) to design the model and the OpenXML SDK to copy the resulting model to an Excel 2013 workbook.

I had thought originally that this wasn’t possible; when I first tried it, the model copied OK but the workbook connection couldn’t access it. Turned out, this was due to using a V1 model that although upgraded to V2 still used the “Sandbox” cube name rather than the now expected “Model” name. So, all models must be created in PP V2 for this to work.

Also, the “receiving” Excel 2013 workbook must be primed with a data model (easiest way without the add-in is to create two tables and link via relationships option, or just use the Model_2013_template workbook provided).

You can download a POC workbook Example_CopyModels_no_Addin demonstrating this method from here. 

Note:

You’ll need to modify the paths of the example workbooks to suit your environment.

Also, if you copy the workbook out of the downloaded folder, make sure to copy the datasmith xll of the right “bitness” and copy the DocumentFormat.OpenXml.dll or ensure one is available on the GAC or PATH.

Before using the datasmith xll for the first time, right-click and unblock, this can also be a good idea for workbooks with external connections, otherwise Excel can sometimes keep certain functionality “locked” 1st time you access such files.

Having copied the model into the Excel 2013 workbook, save & re-open before making any further changes.

If you look  at the code you’ll see it’s also possible to copy models for 2010 to 2010 and from 2013 to 2013 or indeed from 2013 back to 2010. This general coping of models from workbook to workbook was the use-case I had in mind when I first discovered this (not as a way of getting around lack of add-in). Very useful during model development allowing different views to be tried against a first developed (or commonly used) data model. Could also be used when live to allow a single model-refresh to be used by many “view” workbooks.

Have fun.

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